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Molecular Biology

Gillian Bates, currently co-director of the Huntington’s Disease Research Centre and professor of Neurogenetics at University College London, is at the forefront of the study of the genetic and molecular causes underlying Huntigton’s Disease.

Previously Head of the Division of Genetics and Molecular Medicine at King’s College London, Professor Gillian Bate’s interests comprise the study of this disease pathogenesis and respective validation of therapeutic targets. Her recognized and well-known work made her one of the biggest authorities on the study of this devastating disease that affects movements skills and cognitive abilities. Gillian Bates is also a member of the select Council of the Royal Society. In a revolutionizing and mesmerizing way, Professor Bates has altered the paradigm of study of neurodegenerative diseases.

 

Neurosciences

 

Grégoire Courtine is an Associate Professor at the Federal Institute of Technology of Lausanne (EPFL). In 2012, he accepted from the International Paraplegic Foundation the Chair in Spinal Cord Repair at EPFL’s Centre of Neuroprosthetics and the Brain Mind Institute.

Initially, his study focused on the understanding of the neural networks of locomotion and neuronal plasticity and the potential of effective rehabilitation of locomotion. Grégoire Courtine became internationally famous when he succeeded to recover mobility in paraplegic rats, using cerebral implants.

In November 2016, Courtine announced on Nature that he had executed this deed in monkeys, a feat that was received with great repercussion from worldwide media.

Having received numerous prizes, such as the 2007 UCLA Chancellor’s Award and the Schellenberg Prize in 2009, Grégoire Courtine’s work is indeed impressive and the clinic potencial of his accomplishments in the treatment of paralisis are really remarkable.



Molecular Biology

Professor Ivan Đikić is Director of the Institute of Biochemistry II at the Goethe University of Frankfurt, having developed relevant advances in the study of cellular signalling mecanisms.

Ivan Đikić has brilliantly demonstrated how ubiquitin, a small ubiquous protein, contributes to regulate a series of pathways in the inner cell. Author to numerous publications in international high impact scientific journals, has dramatically altered how Science sees this molecule. From proteossomal activity to selective autophagy regulation, his undoubtely relevant research is of great scientific interest. Thus, it is no wonder he has received more than a dozen prizes and awards such as The Order of Duke Branimir in 2010 and the 2013 Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize.